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News Story
Updated: 03/08/2018 01:19:01AM
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FILE - In this Feb. 19, 2018 file photo, Nikolas Cruz, accused of murdering 17 people in the Florida high school shooting, appears in court for a status hearing in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Cruz was formally charged Wednesday, March 7, with 17 counts of first-degree murder, which could mean a death sentence if he is convicted. (Mike Stocker/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP, Pool, File)

Florida Rep. Patricia Williams (D-Ft. Lauderdale), foreground, pats Rep. Roy Hardemon (D-Miami) on the back aster Hardemon said he got rid of his guns during the school safety debate on the House floor at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Rep. Janet Cruz (D-Tampa) walks around a group of 20 college students and activists as they stage a die-in on the 4th floor rotunda between the House and Senate chambers while the House takes up the school safety bill at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Tuesday March 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Front to back, Rep. Bobby Payne (R-Palatka), Rep. Clay Yarborough (R- Jacksonville) and Rep. Rick Roth (R- Palm Beach) look at their mobile devices on the House floor as the school safety debate moves into the afternoon at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Rep. Chris Sprowls (R-Clearwater) talks with Rep. Cord Byrd (R-Jacksonville) during the school safety debate on the House floor at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Speaker of the House Rep. Richard Corcoran (R-Lutz) speaks with Representatives and Senators at the dais on the House floor at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Speaker of the House Rep. Richard Corcoran (R-Lutz) speaks with Representatives and Senators at the dais during the school safety debate on the House floor at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Rep. Kristin Diane Jacobs, speaks on the gun safety bill in the House chamber at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday, March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

Florida Rep. Michael Bileca (R-Miami), center left, listens as Rep. Chris Latvala (R-Clearwater) speak on the school safety bill in the House chamber at the Florida Capital in Tallahassee, Fla., Wednesday, March 7, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser)

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions addresses the California Peace Officers' Association 26th Annual Law Enforcement Legislative Day, 7, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. The Trump administration on Tuesday sued to block California laws that extend protections to people living in the U.S. illegally. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

By CURT ANDERSON, BRENDAN FARRINGTON and JOSH REPLOGLE

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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The Florida House passed a school safety bill Wednesday that includes new restrictions on rifle sales and a program to arm some teachers, sending the measure to the governor for his signature.

The vote of 67-50 reflected a mix of Republicans and Democrats in support and opposition. The measure, a response to the shootings at a Parkland high school that left 17 dead, is supported by the victims’ families.

Andrew Pollack, who lost his 18-year-old daughter Meadow in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, and Ryan Petty, who lost his 14-year-old daughter Alaina, said there was enough good in the bill that it should pass.

Democratic Rep. Kristin Jacobs said she did not like the idea of arming teachers, but she voted yes. Republican Rep. Jay Fant said raising the minimum age to buy a rifle from 18 to 21 was unconstitutional, and he voted no.

“There is a cultural divide in this room, in this state and across the country. And there’s a bill before us that is not perfect,” said Jacobs, whose district includes Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

The bill would raise the minimum age to buy rifles from 18 to 21 and create a waiting period on sales of the weapons. It would also create a so-called guardian program that would let school employees and many teachers carry handguns if they go through law enforcement training and if the school district decides to participate in the program.

Other provisions would create new mental health programs for schools; establish an anonymous tip line where students and others could report threats to schools, ban bump stocks and improve communication between schools, law enforcement and state agencies.

Fant, who is running for attorney general, said the gun restrictions violate the constitution.

“I just can’t imagine that Nikolas Cruz can commit such a heinous crime and then as a result we tell, potentially, a 20-year-old single mother living alone that she cannot purchase a firearm to defend herself,” Fant said.

The Florida Senate narrowly passed the bill Monday. Gov. Rick Scott declined to say Wednesday whether he would sign the legislation.

Scott has repeatedly said he doesn’t support arming teachers and pushed lawmakers to adopt his proposal, which called for at least one law enforcement officer in every school and one for every thousand students who attend a school.

“I’m going to take the time and I’m going to read the bill and I’m going to talk to families,” Scott told reporters.

Shooting suspect Cruz was formally charged with 17 counts of first-degree murder Wednesday, which could mean a death sentence if he is convicted.

The indictment returned by a grand jury in Fort Lauderdale also charges the 19-year-old with 17 counts of attempted murder for the Valentine’s Day massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland in which 17 people died and more than a dozen others were wounded.

Cruz’s public defender has said he will plead guilty if prosecutors take the death penalty off the table, which would mean a life prison sentence. Prosecutors have 45 days to decide whether they want to seek the death penalty.

James and Kimberly Snead, the couple who gave Cruz a home after his mother died late last year, testified before the grand jury. James Snead and the couple’s attorney, Jim Lewis, wore silver “17” pins to honor the victims of the shooting.

The couple is “trying to do the right thing” and is mourning along with the rest of the Parkland community, Lewis said.

“We’ll let justice take its course at this point,” Lewis said. “They still don’t know what happened, why this happened. They don’t have any answers. They feel very badly for everybody.”

Cruz told investigators he took an AR-15 rifle to his former school on Feb. 14 and started shooting into classrooms.

Jail records released by the Broward Sheriff’s Office show Cruz was being held in solitary confinement. Officers described Cruz as avoiding eye contact with deputies but also being cooperative and engaged with his visitors.

The report said Cruz “often sits with a blank stare,” asked for a Bible to read and appeared to be “smiling and giggling” during one visit with his attorneys. Investigators and psychiatrists also have visited Cruz in his single-person cell in the jail’s infirmary, where officers note his activities every 15 minutes.

His brother visited him twice, along with Rocxanne Deschamps, who took in both teens after their mother died in November. Cruz lived with Deschamps only briefly before moving in with the Sneads.




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