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News Story
Updated: 10/30/2013 08:03:01AM

Lemur facility opens doors for rare glimpse at cute (but endangered) animals

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN, shoffman@sun-herald.com
Some of the lemurs at the Lemur Conservation Foundation are kept in large cages, for instance if they are sick or breeding. The 13-acre facility also has two open forested areas in which lemurs can live in groups much as they would in the wild.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN, shoffman@sun-herald.com
A Red ruffed lemur hangs from a tree branch in the forested compound at the Lemur Conservation Foundation. Two such natural compounds exist there, and the borders are kept clear so inquisitive individuals won't be able to escape.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
A Ring-tailed lemur is given a raisin treat by Dr. Alison Grand to entice the young lemur to the field scale to monitor the growth and health of the animal. The Lemur Conservation Foundation is holding a public open house on Nov. 2.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
This Ring-tailed lemur mother and baby are weighed to monitor the development of the young animal. Each animal has a radio collar to monitor their movements within the compound.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
A Ring-tailed lemur watches the activity inside of its forested enclosure at the Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka City, where they can roam in a setting similar to their natural habitat.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
This Red Ruffed Lemur is inquisitive about the photographer inside of the large forest habitat. Lemurs are found only in Madagascar and some species are critically endangered.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
Pattie Walsh Director, Research and Operations at the Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka is greeted by a curious Red Ruffed Lemur inside of the 10-acre enclosure at the facility. As primates, lemurs enjoy climbing and hanging from tree branches.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com

Pattie Walsh, director of Research and Operations at the Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka City, gets the attention of a Red Ruffed Lemur living in a forested enclosure.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY SUSAN E. HOFFMAN, shoffman@sun-herald.com
Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka City has two large, open enclosures of wooded habitat where lemurs can live in groups as they do in the wild. The border around the fence is kept clear on both sides so wandering individuals won't escape.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY DANA CLAUSING, dana@clausingphotography.com
A Ring-tailed lemur clings to a tree branch at the Lemur Conservation Foundation in Myakka City. The facility presently his home to 44 lemurs of several species, and has an active breeding program at the site.

By SUSAN E. HOFFMAN

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They’re furry. They’re playful. They’re awfully darned cute.

And they are endangered.

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