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News Story
Updated: 12/12/2013 08:00:01AM

Veterans commemorate Pearl Harbor

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ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Members of the DeSoto Veterans Council prepare to drop a wreath of flowers into the Peace Rivedr to remember all who lost their lives in that "day that will live in infamy."

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Veterans filled the old Peace River Bridge bridge Saturday for a ceremony to commemorate the attack on Pearl Harbor.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Jared Deriso, 13, talks with Charles Burmeister, a disabled veteran who was stationed in Germany when Pearl Harbor was bombed. Jared said he would like to join the service some day inhonor of his grandfather, past American Legion Commander Robert Thomas,who was a child in Hawaii the day Pearl Harbor was bombed.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Scott Langfang of Arcadia plays Taps during the ceremony to commemorate the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Veterans Charles Caldwell, Art Krause, Jerry Lonergan and Charles Anderson will drop the commemorative wreath along with Robert Thomas, right, past commander of American Legion Post K11.

ARCADIAN PHOTO BY JOHN BLACK, photeke@gmail.com

Gazing at the Peace River, Tim Martin recalls his uncle, Carl Martin, whowas docked in Pearl Harbor on the USS Neveda. He was working in the galley of the ship when it was bombed at 7 a.m. on Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941. His buddy had been wounded and Carl struggled to carry his shipmate through the ship to the dock before the Neveda sunk.

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The DeSoto County Veterans Honor Guard led a ceremony Saturday to commemorate the 72nd anniversary of the Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor, propelling the United States into World War II.

The Japanese Navy launched an attack on the U.S. naval base located at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941, beginning at 7:48 a.m. President Franklin D. Roosevelt called it “a date which will live in infamy,” as the United States embarked immediately into war against Japan. The surprise attack left 2.386 dead and another 1,139 wounded.

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