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News Story
Updated: 12/02/2017 06:58:00AM

Historic year

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MAP PROVIDED BY NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER
Map of Atlantic named Storms

PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Bayshore Road in Charlotte Harbor on Sept. 11, the day after Irma.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY CHARLOTTE COUNTY

Taylor Road in Punta Gorda on Sept. 11, the day after Irma struck.

CARIBBEAN SEA - SEPTEMBER 8: In this NOAA handout image, NOAA's GOES satellite shows Hurricane Irma as it moves towards the Florida Coast as a category 4 storm in the Caribbean Sea taken at 14:45 UTC on September 08, 2017. Hurricane Irma barreled through the Turks and Caicos Islands as a category 4 storm en route to a destructive encounter with Florida this weekend. (Photo by NOAA GOES Project via Getty Images)

AP FILE PHOTO
It was a busy hurricane season.

SUN FILE PHOTO
Clean up and debris removal remains a priority for Charlotte and Sarasota counties post Hurricane Irma.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Debris piles like this one can still be seen in parts of the region.

An American flag is torn as Hurricane Irma passed through Southwest Florida., Sunday, Sept. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

SUN PHOTO BY GARY ROBERTS

A shortage tied to Hurricane Irma led to September lines, like this one at the Sunoco at U.S. 41 and Midway Boulevard in Port Charlotte. Legislators are considering the creation of gasoline fuel farms.

SUN PHOTO BY TOM O'NEILL
Street flooding along Retta Esplanade in Punta Gorda on Sept. 12 caused by Hurricane Irma. Legislators are considering a multiple options tied to development and abandonment of areas that tend to flood, amind increasingly powerful and numerous hurricanes. One proposal would call for the state to buy such lands or create permanent conservation easements.

SUN PHOTO BY TOM O'NEILL
Street flooding Sept. 12 caused by Hurricane Irma along Chasteen Street in Punta Gorda.

SUN PHOTO BY TOM O'NEILL
Roof damage caused by Hurricane Irma in La Casa Mobile Home Park in North Port.

SUN PHOTO BY TOM O'NEILL
Roof damage caused by Hurricane Irma in La Casa Mobile Home Park in North Port.

Jean Chatelier walks down a street flooded by Hurricane Irma after retrieving his uniform from his house so he could return to work at a supermarket in Fort Myers, on Sept. 12, 2017. Chattier walked about a mile each way in knee-high water as a Publix supermarket was planning to reopen. "I want to go back to work. I want to help," said Chatelier. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

By SOMMER BROKAW

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Emergency management directors in Charlotte and Sarasota counties are thankful for rest as the six-month hurricane season came to an end Thursday.

“It’s been a fairly uneventful 13 years, but now we had Irma. The first and second week of September there was a lot of sleep that was not had,” said Charlotte County Emergency Management Director Gerard Mallet. “Now, we’re picking up the pieces.”

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