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News Story
Updated: 03/08/2014 08:00:03AM

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SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER

Fire Lt. Tony Thomann utilizes one of about 2,500 radios that officials throughout Charlotte County use as a vital part of communication. By 2017, the county's analog radio system must be switched to digital. Officials are hoping for a renewal in the penny sales tax, so revenue might help pay for the pricey project.

SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER
Fire Lt. Tony Thomann utilizes one of about 2,500 radios that officials throughout Charlotte County use as a vital part of communication. By 2017, the county's analog radio system must be switched to digital. Officials are hoping for a renewal in the penny sales tax, so revenue might help pay for the pricey project.

SUN PHOTO BY ADAM KREGER

Charlotte County radio manager Doug Blevins configures a base station, which is used for communication in one of the local fire stations. Officials are working to replace or upgrade about 900 of the county's 2,500 radios so they have digital compatibility. The county will switch from an analog system to a digital one within the next few years.

By ADAM KREGER

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An essential aspect of local communication is becoming obsolete, and something has to be done before that day hits.

Officials throughout Charlotte County utilize about 2,500 radios to talk to one another — in schools, school buses, hospitals, dispatch centers, ambulances, firetrucks and police cars, for example — all via the public safety radio system. But the radios operate on an analog system, which soon will be a thing of the past.

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