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News Story
Updated: 01/24/2014 08:00:01AM

City employees lauded

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SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com
A North Port firefighter reaches out his hand to congratulate Robert Potier, left, on being named the 2013 North Port Employee of the Year Thursday, during the city's annual luncheon at the Geroge Mullen Activity Center. Potier, the city's chief mechanic, received a standing ovation.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com

Raymond Coyle was named the city's Firefighter of the Year Thursday at the luncheon.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com

North Port Fire Chief Bill Taaffe, left, stands with the newly named Fire Officer of the Year, Battalion Chief Karl Bennett, and City Manager Jonathan Lewis Thursday at the awards ceremony.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com

Fifteen-year Road and Drainage employee John Klein receives a big hug from City Clerk Helen Raimbeau. Klein was awarded for helping employees. He also helps others during traffic crashes, pushing cars out of the roadway and changing tires.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com

Fifteen-year Road and Drainage employee John Klein receives a big hug from City Clerk Helen Raimbeau. Klein was awarded for helping employees. He also helps others during traffic crashes, pushing cars out of the roadway and changing tires.

SUN PHOTO ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH, eallen@sun-herald.com
Derek Bartolotta gets a hug from his father Peter at the awards ceremony Thursday. Bartolotta was named North Port Police Officer of the Year.

By ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

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NORTH PORT — With a fleet of more than 380 city vehicles and 120 police cars, something always needs to be fixed. Chief mechanic Robert Potier is in charge of making sure all of those vehicles are safe and operational.

Over the past couple of years, Potier has been asked to do a lot more than turn wrenches and change transmission fluid. During a transitional period in North Port’s Fleet Maintenance Division last year, Potier did more than his own job. He had four different managers, who, at times, counted on his institutional knowledge of the operation.

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