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News Story
Updated: 08/11/2017 08:30:00AM

The state of girls in STEM studies

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Over 150 students and adults from Sarasota and Manatee County School Districts participated in the 2nd annual Tech Savvy Workshop held at University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee on May 13.


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The Venice High School team placed first in the CPR event at the 2015 STEMsmart Summit. Here they are congratulated by Todd Bowden (left) of Suncoast Technical College and Mark Pritchett (right) of Gulf Coast Community Foundation.

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Vex Robotics, a company that creates tools that educators and mentors will use to shape the learners of today into the problem-solving leaders of tomorrow, celebrated women in engineering at a recent Technology Student Association Conference.

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Women in Engineering was the focus of the National TSA (Technology Student Association) Conference in June in Orlando.


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These are the mean mathematics and science literacy assessment scores of 15-year-old students in the United States, by sex: 2003–12. The table shows that in high schools, the STEM test scores of boys and girls are very similar.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY BONNIE VERMINSKI

Three Charlotte middle school girls selected for Tech Trek camp are pictured, from left, Hailey Ricard of L.A. Ainger, Staisee Benitez of Port Charlotte and Abrianna Seibert of Murdock..

SUN PHOTOS BY TIM KERN, tim@tkphotoshop.com
Englewood Elementary School’s third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade classes lined the school hallways to cheer on the 18 STEM fair participants as they headed to the school bus for their trip to the district competition earlier this year. Many of the participants in the fair were girls.

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Krysta Fowler and mom Diane.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Karoline Bellamy, 15, left, and Hannah Schoff, 14, both Lemon Bay High School sophomores, check the larvae in water at the lab during this summer's STEM camp.

SUN PHOTO BY ELAINE ALLEN-EMRICH

Madison Glidden, 12, a rising seventh grader at L.A. Ainger Middle School works with Jessica Staples using micropipettes during this summer's STEM camp at Lemon Bay High.

SUN PHOTO BY ALISON POSNER

Student Chloe Nichols was amazed when she learned how to take apart a flashlight to make a bulb light up using only a battery, a wire and a bulb. Last year, Myakka River Elementary School in Gulf Cove presented its first STEM Wars.

SUN PHOTO BY ALISON POSNER

Myakka River Elementary School in Gulf Cove presented its first STEM Wars last year, a family night where fourth- and fifth-graders and their families participated in experiments made from household objects. Volunteers at the event included staff and faculty and members of the Lemon Bay High School National Honor Society. Here, Grace Adams tried to make a paperclip float using a plastic fork.

SUN PHOTO BY ALISON POSNER

Morgan Phillips flies her robo-copter after constructing it with her father during last year's STEM wars at Myakka River Elementary School in Gulf Cove.

SUN PHOTO BY MICHELLE VALKOV

Ethny Indico takes part in a robotics competition recently at Woodland Middle School.

By DEBBIE FLESSNER

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Fired this week, disgraced Google engineer James Damore said there are biological causes behind gender inequality in the tech industry.

Regardless of the validity of the claim, that isn’t slowing local efforts to push more female students into the studies of STEM — science, technology, engineering and math.

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