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News Story
Updated: 07/20/2014 08:00:01AM

Dead Sea Scrolls unlock our religious roots

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PHOTO PROVIDED BY STEVEN DERFLER

In the center of this photograph is one of the man-made caves where some of the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered. This cave is located near Qumran, 31 miles east of Jerusalem.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY STEVEN DERFLER

The Copper Scroll is the most unique of the Dead Sea Scrolls, according to Steven Derfler, Ph.D. This scroll lists dozens of sites where gold and silver valued in the millions of dollars were buried secretly, according to Derfler. This scroll currently is housed in Jordan’s Amman Archaeological Museum.

Richard Ramos

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It was 1947, and the global cataclysm of World War II had ended less than 18 months earlier. Life around the world and in the Holy Land was slowly returning to normal.

For a young Bedouin shepherd from the Ta’amireh tribe, normalcy meant searching for strays along the northwestern rim of the Dead Sea. In one of the many caves dotting the mountainous terrain, instead of a wayward animal, he found 10 large clay lidded jars.

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