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News Story
Updated: 04/24/2017 02:48:27PM

South of county still stays soggy

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Phil Attinger/News-Sun

Kaye Anglebrandt stands by the palm tree in her yard to show how far it has fallen since floods in September soaked hers and neighbors' yards in Sunshine RV Park in Lake Placid. Even after several inches of water was pumped off the property since then, her yard is still soaked.

Phil Attinger/News-Sun

Kaye Anglebrandt steps carefully through her yard in Sunshine RV Park in Lake Placid. The yard is still soaked after almost two months since park owners pumped off floodwaters. She and a neighbor said the park, which didn't usually flood, has seen standing water every rainy season for four years.

Phil Attinger/News-Sun

Buckled home skirting at the Sunshine RV Park home of Kaye Anglebrandt and her husband shows how ground may have sunk during September floods. She and other neighbors have said they've suffered damage to appliances, air-conditioning ducts and homes themselves as a result of heavy surface water amounts over the last four rain seasons.

Phil Attinger/News-Sun

Standing water under 47 Pryor Lane in Lake Placid demonstrates how long rains have stayed in and around some homes in the area. In addition to flooded yards in Venus and Sun 'N Lakes Lake Placid, residents in mobile home parks, like this one in Sunshine RV Park, have seen standing water after rains this year and many years before this.

Courtesy photo

Water stands after September rains on Pryor Lane in Sunshine RV Park in Lake Placid. Residents said it took a lot of pumping to get the flood waters to recede, but they're still left with damaged homes, appliances and air-conditioners, as well as standing water in yards breeding mold and mosquitos.

Courtesy photo

A pump siphons away in September behind homes on Hershey Lane in Sunshine RV Park. Residents said the floodwaters have left, but soggy lawns with standing water have remained, leaving a health hazard with mosquitos and mold.

Courtesy photo

Gene and Carol Stoker couldn't walk and could barely drive across their yard and driveway — here marked by reflector posts — after heavy rains in September. They complained at the time how other properties pumping off water may have aggravated their situation. Highlands County Engineer Clinton Howerton Jr. said the problem may be a high water table, and high water levels may stay high for many years.

Phil Attinger/News-Sun

A Leisure Lane resident in Venus gets unexpected guests Wednesday with a flock of Canadian geese dropping in for a day. Water remains in some yards, an overflow from canals in the rural subdivision and a remnant of flooding from September.

Courtesy photo

The view from a home on Hershey Lane in Sunshine RV Park shows how floodwaters got up around air-conditioning units in September. Residents said many of them had to replace ducts and repair the heat pumps thanks to damage from high water and mold.

Courtesy photo

Gene and Carol Stoker couldn't walk and could barely drive across their yard and driveway — here marked by reflector posts — after heavy rains in September. They complained at the time how other properties pumping off water may have aggravated their situation. Highlands County Engineer Clinton Howerton Jr. said the problem may be a high water table, and high water levels may stay high for many years.

Courtesy photo

Gene and Carol Stoker couldn't walk and could barely drive across their yard and driveway — here marked by reflector posts — after heavy rains in September. They complained at the time how other properties pumping off water may have aggravated their situation. Highlands County Engineer Clinton Howerton Jr. said the problem may be a high water table, and high water levels may stay high for many years.

By PHIL ATTINGER

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LAKE PLACID — Kaye Anglebrandt has a palm tree leaning over in her front yard, a yard full of soggy muck under the turf; the skirting on her mobile home has buckled from where, she said, soil has settled.

She and her neighbors, like other Lake Placid and Venus-area residents, found themselves surrounded by water after September’s downpours and Hurricane Matthew’s rainbands. After nearly two months of sunshine and pumping the southeast quadrant of the park, yards haven’t fully dried yet.

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