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News Story
Updated: 06/14/2017 05:18:02PM

Stars and Stripes Forever

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SUN PHOTO BY MONICA AMAYA

PCHS NJROTC places American flags on veteran graves at Restlawn Memorial Gardens in May.

PHOTO PROVIDED

Members of American Legion Post 113, left, and the Lemon Bay High School ROTC, participate in a flag-lowering ceremony this year at Placida Harbor.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION
(Cable Hoover/Gallup Independent via AP)

SUN PHOTO BY PRISCILLA MCDANIEL
The American flag is hoisted for a Flag Day ceremony in DeSoto County last year.

American flag flying in the wind

Flags at a memorial service for U. S. Army Spc. Luke Runyan, who was killed in 2008 in Iraq..(AP Photo/York Daily Record, Jason Plotkin)

Carolyn Eligan from Pittsburgh, waves a flag as Barack Obama speaks at the Soldiers and Sailors Museum and Memorial in Pittsburgh, Pa. (AP File Photo/Alex Brandon)

PHOTO PROVIDED BY JEFF BRIDGMAN

An American flag with 27 stars -- made when Florida became a state. Jeff Bridgman said these "are among the rarest of the 19th century. Very few period examples exist and most major collections of early flags that have been assembled over the years have not included one."

PHOTO PROVIDED BY JEFF BRIDGMAN

A 33-star American flag has 1860 Republican candidates printed in the stripes: “For President, Abram Lincoln. For Vice President, Hannibal Hamlin.” "There has been much speculation on the variation of Lincoln’s first name on campaign objects," Jeff Bridgman says. "Roger Fischer, scholar of campaign material culture, suggests that objects made for 'Abram' Lincoln were manufactured early in 1860, before many easterners discovered the relatively-unknown Republican candidate’s true name. It has also been suggested that Abram was a nickname, given to him by close friends, but Daniel Weinberg, longtime Lincoln scholar and owner of the Abraham Lincoln Bookstore, relates that this isn't true, and friends simply called him 'Lincoln.' Perhaps the makers simply shortened the name to save space. In any event, the use of 'Abram' is an interesting peculiarity."

SUN PHOTO BY SCOTT LAWSON

The American flag was adopted by the Second Continental Congress on this date in 1777.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY JEFF BRIDGMAN

The 34-star American national parade flag, printed on cotton, made during the beginning of the Civil War. "The stars are arranged in a rare and beautiful variation of what is known as the 'Great Star,' a large star made out of smaller stars, which ranks firmly among collectors as one of the most coveted of all 19th century geometric designs," Jeff Bridgman explains.

SUN PHOTO BY SCOTT LAWSON

The American flag was adopted by the Second Continental Congress on this date in 1777. While the Congress said it should have 13 stripes and its stars on a blue background, there have been many varitions through the last 240 years.

SUN PHOTO BY CHRIS PORTER

Gina Klotz of Englewood wanted to celebrate her family's antique flag as Flag Day 2017 approached. Klotz inherited the 37-star flag from her mother, and not much is known about how it got int othe family. She said it probably belonged to her mother's father, who lived in Rutherford, N.J. This 37-star flag first went into service on July 4, 1867 when Nebraska became a state. The flag was in service for 10 years before the 38th star was added, signifying Colorado's entrance into the Union on July 4, 1877.

By SCOTT LAWSON North Port Editor

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It was 240 years ago today that the Second Continental Congress adopted the description of the American Flag.

For generations, it has brought emotions whether unfurled in the wind or folded 13 times and handed to a veteran’s surviving spouse.

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